June 28, 2020
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A Review Of Lincoln Logs Building Sets

Author: Administrator
Lincoln Logs building sets have been in children's bedrooms for nearly a hundred years, and even though various aspects of the sets and also the packaging have been modified, you'll find minimal difference between the Lincoln Log sets presently available in stores and the ones with which some of our grandparents will probably have played. The little logs are a terrific legacy to pass on to our own youngsters, specifically if we can likewise pass on the story of the manner in which these logs came to be.

Near the beginning of the 20th century, America had an architect called Frank Lloyd Wright. He wasn't in this adventure, however. Frank happened to have a son named John Lloyd Wright, and they both enjoyed a visit to Tokyo during the time that John was very young. While in Tokyo, he beheld the earthquake-proof Imperial Hotel as it was being constructed, and noticed that the foundation was made of sturdy, interlocking beams a lot like the notched logs which our own pioneers used to build log cabins.

Around 1916, that perceptive young man introduced a collection of interlocking toy logs that came with wooden windows, doors and roof frames, and called them Lincoln Logs. The financial success of this building set was brought about by present societal trends along with the young man's creativity. That same time period experienced the beginning of tinker toys and erector sets, as well as the manufacture and subsequent sinking of the Titanic. The achievement of Lincoln Logs and other building toys was caused directly by America's escalating infatuation with the miracles we were convinced we could construct.

Sales of Lincoln Logs crested during the late 20s and effectively made it through the Depression and World War II. The mid-century baby boom caused one more sales improvement for these durable educational toys, and the Cowboy craze during the early 50s only made play-scale log cabins even more popular. Lincoln Logs were one of the earliest toys to be advertised on a television show, the Pioneer Playhouse in 1953.

In the course of the 60s and 70s, several parts were incrementally supplanted by lower priced plastic, until merely the logs remained wooden. In recent years, Lincoln Logs has commenced marketing all-wood sets once more.

The company presently sells two collections; their "Nostalgia" collection that includes nothing but wood parts, "Just like you remember," and also the "Classic" collection that comes with real wood logs and colorful plastic accessories like doors, roofs and action figures. The kits cost between approximately $20 and $40 and might be bought on line or at specific stores.

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